Author Topic: Cambridgeshire Progress Report  (Read 36138 times)

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Offline John Candy

Re: Cambridgeshire Progress Report
« Reply #15 on: Jul 28 2013 21:21 »
In response to requests, below is link to download the track plan (a PDF file).

While the overall scheme is now (literally!) "set in concrete", the track layout at the station and junction sites may be subject to alterations as the scheme progresses.

John.

http://lakes-pages.com/plan1.pdf
My fellow Members, ask not what your Society can do for you, ask what you can do for your Society.

Offline John Candy

Re: Cambridgeshire Progress Report
« Reply #16 on: Jul 29 2013 09:13 »
Could have done with some of that!!
Certainly a lot quicker than the way I have been doing it!



Woke up to this .... concrete being pumped into the base slab for my neighbour's new car port.
My fellow Members, ask not what your Society can do for you, ask what you can do for your Society.

Offline 454

Re: Cambridgeshire Progress Report
« Reply #17 on: Jul 29 2013 10:08 »
OTT, over the top!

Hi-jack it quick while you can.

cheers
Dave
454

Offline blagdon

Re: Cambridgeshire Progress Report
« Reply #18 on: Jul 30 2013 17:22 »
Are you sure that concrete is really for your neighbour, or are you adding raised base area for the Essex extension?

Ian the Gauge '3' Pirate

Offline John Candy

Re: Cambridgeshire Progress Report
« Reply #19 on: Jul 30 2013 20:32 »
Ian,

In that direction (due West) it would have to be the Northampton extension!!!

John.
My fellow Members, ask not what your Society can do for you, ask what you can do for your Society.

Offline John Candy

Re: Cambridgeshire Progress Report
« Reply #20 on: Aug 12 2013 18:36 »
A couple of weeks have passed since last update.

A period of relentless (when the weather has permitted) excavating, concrete mixing and pillar construction has seen both high (single track) level and low (double track) level circuit groundworks almost completed.
The support piers count now stands at 82 and the concrete foundations for another 30 have been poured. All the tall piers have been constructed and most of the remaining supports will be just above, ground level.
Another 9 foundation blocks remain to be excavated and concreted.

The pillars for the spurs off the high level circuit to the main terminus are in place but the terminus area itself is awaiting a visit from my builder. The terminus will be on "Filcris" recycled plastic post supports and it needs a powered auger to drill the 21 post holes, since the ground is hard and with lots of roots....also I have asked him to replace a section of fencing and gate which are past their best.

Have so far mixed 5 tons of concrete and mortar, used 700 bricks and 170 large, dense, concrete blocks.

A few photos attached.

1.Panoramic view showing mainline route (low level on 20ft radius curve) in foreground with high level viaduct behind.



2. View from end of 3-track section with single track route ahead (climbing to viaduct level) and mainline (on falling gradient) curving away to right on 20ft radius.



3.  A view following on from above with route of mainline towards point where it passes beneath viaduct.



4. A view looking upgrade from the viaduct along mainline.



5. View in opposite diection from that shown in "2" above.



6. Towards 3-track section and site of major interchange/junctions between HL and LL lines. Mainline route trailing in from left and site of carriage sidings (3 x 5 metres) to left of mainlines. The junction station itself will occupy a site out of view in this shot (the tracks will curve to left behind the bushes).



7. This is the site of the station with 5 through platforms plus a bay (the tracks curve away to right and link with the previous view of ijunction).



8. Taken from route of HL return loop (this completes circuit on HL single line to permit continuous running) towards junction between this loop and the line from the principal (4 platform) terminus (that line is seen trailing in from left before both cross the viaduct which starts just behind the large bush).



9. The route leading from the viaduct towards the principal terminus.


My fellow Members, ask not what your Society can do for you, ask what you can do for your Society.

Offline John Candy

Re: Cambridgeshire Progress Report
« Reply #21 on: Aug 15 2013 14:09 »
Unsettled weather has again put a stop to concrete pouring and bricklaying but yesterday I did manage to complete the foundations of the main (junction) station area.

Fist photo shows the general area looking South (towards the high level branch terminus marked by tall pillars in background).



Second view is looking Northwards, the left hand row of pillars is the single track HL line descending to the junction, the right hand line of pillars is the LL double track. All radii are a minimum of 20ft for fast running.
The station area starts where the left hand row of pillars widens.




The third view is in the same direction, the (red) spirit level marking the approx. point at which the platforms will start.
Each of the five through platforms will be around 18ft in length, with the bay platform around 10ft in length.



Final view is from opposite direction. The trackbed will be level through the station and the differing pillar heights illustrate how the ground falls away. The platforms will start from the region of the second brick base from the camera.

My fellow Members, ask not what your Society can do for you, ask what you can do for your Society.

Offline John Candy

Re: Cambridgeshire Progress Report
« Reply #22 on: Aug 17 2013 23:46 »
This week has been a game of "cat 'n' mouse" with rain but have still been able to make progress.

The bases and pillar supports for the junction area and the high level return loop have been completed.

1 : Looking from the high level loop towards the junction with the low level mainline coming in from left.





2 : View from the mainline with high level loop climbing away to left.



3 : The high level line viewed from the point where it comes off the viaduct and splits (the line to main terminus veers away to right).
These are two sides of the triangular "wye" junction, the third side running from left to right across the background.
The plastic curvature templates have been laid to highlight the route.



Opposite direction looking to junction.



General view of area.




Will soon be ready to start laying timber track base : Order just placed with Screwfix for 1000 M8 coach screws and various other fixings and already have several hundred feet of C24 tanalised planks, 47mm thick, in various widths from 4 inches upwards.
My fellow Members, ask not what your Society can do for you, ask what you can do for your Society.

Offline cabbage

Re: Cambridgeshire Progress Report
« Reply #23 on: Aug 18 2013 08:30 »
John,

Have you ever worked with Tanalith treated timber before? Because if you haven't here are a few helpful tips(!)

The Tanalith process does not penetrate to the centre of the wood -you will need to seal the cut ends.
The timber thus has a an outer "crust" that tools have to penetrate. It can seem as if nothing is happening and then you cut through the crust and into "normal" timber. This can "catch you out" if you are using a hand held circular saw. You cannot use "conventional" PVA based glues,  (water proof or otherwise). This is because the crust affects the drying time of the glue -giving a far weaker bond. The "wet" inner wood bond can take several days to cure. Use a Urea Formaldehyde or Silicone based glue. Casein and Alephatic based glues will work (I am told) but I have never tried them. Wear heavy duty gloves when using Tanalith timber -this is because the splinters are DIRE once they get into your skin!!! You cannot dispose of sawdust or scrap bits into the recycle bin -they have to be collected and returned to the recycle centre for proper disposal. Fence paint sticks to it rather well -but due to the residual colour greeny/bluey/brown of the process you will need at least two coats. Tanalith timber is also very "wet" -thus it is heavier than normal timber -this also produces problems when cutting into the wood. Use PLENTY of soap on the saw blade and beware of pockets of "liquid" when drilling. Drill holes SLOWLY as the liquid sawdust gunge can easily clog up the drill bit.

Apart from the above it is actually quite pleasant to work with and child safe!!!

Both of my railways were built using it and I enjoy using it.

regards

ralph

Offline John Candy

Re: Cambridgeshire Progress Report
« Reply #24 on: Aug 18 2013 09:29 »
Thank you, Ralph.

I had already read up on the benefits/health hazards of "Tanalith" (apparently arsenic is released if you burn the stuff) and was in two minds as to whether or not to buy it.
In the end the 15 year guarantee clinched it!
It came with a warning about resealing cuts and holes to maintain the warranty.

The point about the "crust" and moisture content I did not know....it explains why the 15 foot lengths are much heavier than I expected!
I shall wear safety glasses, gloves and a dust mask!!

The tips on cutting and drilling will come in useful.

Regards,
John.
My fellow Members, ask not what your Society can do for you, ask what you can do for your Society.

Offline John Candy

Re: Cambridgeshire Progress Report
« Reply #25 on: Aug 28 2013 19:00 »
What have we here?





Is it the remains of a Roman temple?
If it is it must be the earliest surviving example of a concrete structure, possibly by the legendary Robertus Macalpinus (not to be confused with William the Concreter, whose family continues to this day to trade from Battle in Sussex as "1066 William The Concreter"......find him on Google)!

No, it has not been unearthed during excavations by NEAR (the New East Anglian Railway), it is the foundations on the approach to the main terminus (the main MPD will be in this area).

Beyond is the site for the terminus, still awaiting attention and currently in use as a spoil tip (one of several around the site).

Two views of the terminus site.





The only other foundations remaining to be laid are the carriage sidings and the third side of the triangular junction.
Weather permitting, it is hoped to complete the concreting and bricklaying within the next few days.

The terminus is to be supported by "Filcris" plastic posts and my builder (when he gets around to it!) will bring a powered auger to drill the holes.

John.

My fellow Members, ask not what your Society can do for you, ask what you can do for your Society.

Offline cabbage

Re: Cambridgeshire Progress Report
« Reply #26 on: Aug 29 2013 07:03 »
John

It must be nice to have deep soil.... Some of the Metposts in the garden have had to be shortened with an angle grinder(!)

regards

ralph

Offline blagdon

Re: Cambridgeshire Progress Report
« Reply #27 on: Aug 29 2013 22:11 »
John, like so many others I look forward to seeing your layout when its finished. Being large, will there be plenty of carriage sidings, goods yarda and possibly a decent marshalling yard?

Ian the Gauge '3' Pirate

Offline John Candy

Re: Cambridgeshire Progress Report
« Reply #28 on: Aug 31 2013 07:55 »
Ian,

I uploaded a track plan a few weeks ago and the link is repeated below.

http://lakes-pages.com/plan1.pdf

Each terminus will have a goods yard (and I may add a couple of wayside sidings) and there are three 18ft long carriage sidings at the junction (enough to hold 18 large bogie carriages).

No plans to build a replica Whitemoor , Wath or Toton hump yard!!!

Regards,
John.
My fellow Members, ask not what your Society can do for you, ask what you can do for your Society.

Offline 454

Re: Cambridgeshire Progress Report
« Reply #29 on: Aug 31 2013 12:17 »
John,
How do you intend to manage route control when dealing with GTG gatherings avoiding chaos?
Particularly making sure the points are all set correctly when our trains are whizzing around.
Even simple circuits are pitfalls for the unwary.

Very impressive though.
Can't wait to see it in action.

Cheers
Dave
454