Author Topic: Transcote  (Read 1866 times)

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Offline MikeWilliams

Transcote
« on: February 19, 2014, 12:11:17 PM »
GRS list a product "Transcote", to protect transfers.  Doesn't say whether its a spray, though I assume it is, but what is it?  Does any acrylic varnish do the same, or is there some special ingredient which does something to waterslide transfers?

In short, applying transfers is not one of my best skills (to say the least!) and when brushing any varnish/fixative/weathering there is a danger of picking up the transfer, so a sealant is a good idea - does it work and will it stop subsequent brushed paint picking up the surface?

Mike

Offline AllWight

Re: Transcote
« Reply #1 on: February 19, 2014, 12:26:21 PM »
Hi Mike

I personally use the railmatch or games workshop range of aerosol spray varnishes and I get good results.  You have to watch certain varnishes as they can have a slight yellowing effect on the final finish of your model. I have never used Transcote but I suspect it is similar to the products that I use. I would personally avoid any brush on varnishes as this will not give an even finish. 

Mark

Offline MikeWilliams

Re: Transcote
« Reply #2 on: February 19, 2014, 12:30:38 PM »
Thanks Mark, and my local Hobbycraft stocks some of them.  On a model of a not-new wooden and slightly dirty wagon I try hard not to get an even finish and that is why I brush weathering, but I take your point on carriages or locos.

Mike

Offline AllWight

Re: Transcote
« Reply #3 on: February 19, 2014, 12:57:02 PM »
Weathering is one area that I am not fully confident in. I can do it, but I always feel aggrieved when taking all that time to get a model looking tip top to then dirty up a wagon, coach or loco. My G3 and 00 wagon stock for my exhibition layouts have all been weathered by a friend of mine called Tom Rayer who is very good at what he does.

Mark

Offline John Candy

Re: Transcote
« Reply #4 on: February 19, 2014, 01:28:57 PM »
Mike,

I apply Microsol (to make the transfer conform to raised detail and stick to the surface) and when dry apply a coat of Johnsons "Klear" (a plastic floor sealant) which method was recommended in a Model Rail mag many years ago.

When you asked me about this a couple of years ago, you said you thought Johnsons had changed the formula and it was no longer suitable.

I did read in a mag not so very long ago that the formula had again been changed is again suitable for transfer sealing. I have a large (half litre) bottle of the original formula, bought about 10 years ago, so have not tried the new stuff.

John.

My fellow Members, ask not what your Society can do for you, ask what you can do for your Society.

Offline MikeWilliams

Re: Transcote
« Reply #5 on: February 19, 2014, 02:09:35 PM »
Fascinating - thanks John.

Mike

Offline joewatt

Re: Transcote
« Reply #6 on: February 19, 2014, 07:58:19 PM »
I've used GRS Transcote on all my G3 waterslide transfers. I bought it over 6 years ago - I don't think it has a shelf-life. it came in a bottle and it is applied to the transfers by brush - after they have dried. Very little is used on each application, so my bottle will last me forever.

The application is a coating brushed in one direction - followed by similar at 90 degrees 24 hours later. When it is on and dry, it is barely noticeable. It will not lift the transfers after they have dried in position.