Author Topic: Water jet cutting?  (Read 1147 times)

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Offline John Candy

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Water jet cutting?
« on: December 20, 2015, 08:43:46 AM »
Has anyone here yet employed the services of a water jet cutter?

I have no idea (yet) how much it would cost to have LMS coach sides cut in aluminium (or possibly steel) sheet but believe it produces a better finish than laser cutting.

I am considering asking for quotes for a two-car LMS push-pull, a 3-car LMS Inter-District set and some open all-steel (BRCW pattern / "paired" window type) excursion stock (and later some more general LMS gangwayed stock).

As a trial run, I may ask for a LMS 50ft steel full brake which has only a few same size quarterlights and droplights so will be simpler to produce using CAD ... which I have never before tried!

Any comments, suggestions or interest in the stock listed?

John.
My fellow Members, ask not what your Society can do for you, ask what you can do for your Society.

Offline MikeWilliams

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Re: Water jet cutting?
« Reply #1 on: December 20, 2015, 08:55:07 AM »
John,

Water jet does give a better finish on the cut edge.

Disadvantages are extra cost, less places to choose from, more "draw", wider cut so larger minimum sized hole.

I suspect the draw will not matter on coach sides which are thin anyway, but same applies to finish of the edge which can be excellent with a laser.

The minimum hole size may be an issue with holes for door handles etc - worth asking your cutter what size he can do.

I'd be interested to learn how you curve the sides to shape.  Easier in etched brass because you can half-etch horizontal lines into the back which keeps the curve straight, but not so easy with a plain sheet.

Mike

Offline andrewfoster

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Re: Water jet cutting?
« Reply #2 on: January 02, 2016, 04:47:35 AM »
I've had a few water jet cut parts done for the GME bridges and was surprised at what they could do in aluminium alloy. The part in the attached photo is 42 mm dia, 6 mm thick, with 2.4 mm dia holes. Normally, they say they can't do such small holes for that thickness of material, but they needed very little clean-up. There's no perceptible draw on the OD, but as it had to be machined anyway, this wasn't an issue. All the thinner parts are laser cut, with variable results depending on the experience of the person setting up the machine. Long narrow parts can suffer from thermal expansion and positional accuracy issues if not carefully planned.

Andrew
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Offline AlanG

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Re: Water jet cutting?
« Reply #3 on: January 11, 2016, 06:10:30 PM »
I use SCISS down in Staplehurst  Kent. The owner is a keen modelmaker and does a super job.
Best to send a computer drawing thingy that computers read and his turn round isnt to bad. I think his prices are reasonable too

Offline John Candy

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Re: Water jet cutting?
« Reply #4 on: January 11, 2016, 08:36:07 PM »
Alan,

Thank you for your recommendation, I had looked at their website last year and they were "on my radar" so to speak.
Good to hear from someone who has used their services.

Regards,
John.
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Offline jamiepage

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Re: Water jet cutting?
« Reply #5 on: January 11, 2016, 10:25:35 PM »
John,
I can support the recommendation for Sciss, having had water jetted items ranging from five ft. long frames cut from 25mm steel plate, down to small detail parts from thin brass.
They do indeed 'talk the lingo', which gives an additional degree of confidence I think.
Cost -  more than laser cut. Good finish to all edges and no heat hardening.
Delivery time -  for most of my items I could only send an old fashioned pen and paper drawing so I joined a queue, but a simple CAD drawing I managed to cobble together last year (with a great deal of help) was dealt with promptly.

Jamie

Offline John Candy

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Re: Water jet cutting?
« Reply #6 on: July 13, 2017, 10:35:42 AM »
Quote
I am considering asking for quotes for ..........and some open all-steel (BRCW pattern / "paired" window type) excursion stock (and later some more general LMS gangwayed stock).
As a trial run, I may ask for a LMS 50ft steel full brake which has only a few same size quarterlights and droplights so will be simpler to produce using CAD ... which I have never before tried!

I am reviving this old thread from 2015 (in the, perhaps forlorn, hope) that there may now be more interest!

Below are some images of 4mm scale models I built in the early 70's from BSL aluminium kits (not very good pics since taken from low-res Ebay images I took when selling the items around 12 years ago) .
They are just to illustrate the type of LMS coaches which I refer to above.

The "all steel" stock had much simpler underframes than the ordinary Fowler and Stanier (timber-framed, steel panelled) stock, since the all steel body was very much stronger.

The open coaches were used in general service as well as being useful "excursion" stock.

The 50ft BG (full brakes) were in general service and were much used as "buffers" against collision damage in important expresses (following an accident report which contained that recommendation since there was minimal damage to stock after a serious accident ... the all-steel BG behind the tender absorbed most of the impact, suffering just  a buckled end, leaving the rest of the train with minimal damage).

Is anyone interested?



My fellow Members, ask not what your Society can do for you, ask what you can do for your Society.

Offline John Candy

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Re: Water jet cutting?
« Reply #7 on: July 13, 2017, 11:05:20 AM »
Now for followers of the LNER!

I am in the process (in conjunction with another member) of looking at the possibilities for producing the distinctive (cream and green liveried) 1930's Tourist open stock (the first batches were built of plywood, later batches were steel panelled).

There were three basic versions (but with variations between batches) the Open All Third articulated twin- sets; Open Brake 3rd; Buffet car.

As illustrations of the type (although in BR liveries) below are pics of 4mm scale models built from kits in the 70's (again images are not ideal being low-res and taken for Ebay at time of sale).

Any interest in these subjects?




My fellow Members, ask not what your Society can do for you, ask what you can do for your Society.