Author Topic: Linisher - any suggestions?  (Read 2008 times)

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Offline MikeWilliams

Linisher - any suggestions?
« on: September 20, 2016, 11:08:50 AM »
I've decided its about time I bought a linisher.  Spent too long filing the sprue from brass castings and surfacing flat items etc.  It would be nice to speed up production and save my fingers!

Any recommendations for make and model?  Any features to look out for, or avoid?

Mike
 

Offline AshleyW

Re: Linisher - any suggestions?
« Reply #1 on: September 20, 2016, 01:01:12 PM »
graham pearce bought on for finishing off point blades etc. contact him for details of where from


Offline Andy B

Re: Linisher - any suggestions?
« Reply #3 on: September 20, 2016, 04:22:16 PM »
If you want flat, then a cast / machined backplate (not a fabrication) is most necessary.
I had a cheap 'Charnwood' one for woodwork - the belt was a pain to adjust, the 'bearings' wore and then seized and the motor went pop.
So I would avoid the Chinese cheapy cloned ones!

Andy

Offline Andy B

Re: Linisher - any suggestions?
« Reply #4 on: September 20, 2016, 04:44:16 PM »
RJH (the brand of the one that Ian linked to) also do smaller models - such as http://www.rjhfinishing.co.uk/uploads/files/industrial/Muntjac.pdf.

From what I can tell, they are made by 'Aceti' in Italy -  and are industrial machines and not cheap DIY junk.
Worth asking if they can supply with a single phase motor.

Andy

Offline IanT

Re: Linisher - any suggestions?
« Reply #5 on: September 20, 2016, 04:57:22 PM »
It depends on what you have in mind Mike.

With my "model engineer" hat on - I tend to think of a linisher as being a kind of narrow belt sander, typically with a 1-2" wide belt. These are very good at getting into corners (of smaller plate work for instance) and are essentially a powered vertical file in some ways. And no - I'm afraid I don't have one of those.

What I do have are several kinds of belt sanders and an electric file. The 'hand-held' (Lidl) belt sander gets used generally to quickly clean up old/salvaged wood, where using the planner would be overkill. I can mount it on the workmate - as it came with some simple clamps to do so but generally I don't, as I have other options. I also have a 4" belt sander that mounts on my Coronet lathe/saws and it is a very solid bit of kit. It gets used to smooth & size (larger) wood parts and works very well but again it is only used for wood.

Then I have a Warco belt sander, the 'standard' Chinese type with a belt arm that can be used vertically or horizontally, plus it has a circular sanding pad on the side. I only use this for metal work (and never aluminium) and it can remove metal at quite a rate with a coarse belt. It's not as smooth running as the Coronet and the work holding/guiding fittings are much too flimsy in my view (e.g. bent tin). Rather like the cheap 6" Chinese tool grinders, it really would benefit from a decent work table but (unlike my grinders) I haven't got around to doing this yet but it's not a difficult job really. I'm not sure if this is what you are referring to (if so) then they certainly do work but really need a bit of improvement. I think mine has a 3" wide belt.

Finally, the electric 'file' (mine came from Lidls) which is a very useful bit of kit generally and can be used "freehand" with the work clamped safely away from your fingers. This is quite a versatile tool and mine has several 'heads' with different bands (1/2" wide approx.) to use with them. It would do your 'sprues' but wouldn't cope easily with "surfacing" . I intend to find some way of holding mine (with the head vertical) and fitting a work table on which to guide small flat pieces - then it would be very similar to the ME 'linisher' I mentioned earlier. Everything came in a neat carry box and is easy to put away (the Warco is quite heavy)

Just had a look at the Warco website - I have an earlier version of the BDS 460 shown here:

http://www.warco.co.uk/42-belt-sanders-disc-sander-electric-bench-sanding-machines

They certainly work but mine really needs a better work table and guide making for it. Although I tend to separate my sanders into 'wood' and 'metal' - they can be used for both generally - but it's easier to reserve the machines for specific use with a suitable belt fitted.

Hope this helps...

Regards,

IanT

PS Just noticed Andy's post whilst typing this. This is one of the differences between the Coronet and the Chinese belt sanders - the former is noticeably smoother and quieter in use, as it was built "back then" when things were designed to last. But of course mine is part of my Coronet kit (I have two of them) - and a dedicated "linisher" built to this standard would not be cheap if you could find one . However, for occasional use the Chinese sander would be a much cheaper option - especially if you shop around. They are probably all made in the same factory - so it's mostly about the likely aftercare service. I can drive over to Warco if required - much harder when it's someone on eBay.... 


 


Nothing's ever Easy - At least the first time around.

Offline unklian

Re: Linisher - any suggestions?
« Reply #6 on: September 20, 2016, 10:47:34 PM »

 Buy a disc sander, they are much safer and can be set up to sand all sorts of  shapes and sections flat and square. For what I think you are going to be doing Mike a linisher is a sledge hammer for a walnut !

Offline MikeWilliams

Re: Linisher - any suggestions?
« Reply #7 on: September 21, 2016, 10:51:30 AM »
Thank you chaps.  All useful food for thought and at least I know what to look out for.

And especial thanks to the well known G3S stalwart who prefers not to post on here but offered privately to help modify one.

Mike

Offline IanT

Re: Linisher - any suggestions?
« Reply #8 on: October 06, 2016, 11:05:17 PM »
Nothing's ever Easy - At least the first time around.

Offline MikeWilliams

Re: Linisher - any suggestions?
« Reply #9 on: October 07, 2016, 06:54:35 AM »
Thanks Ian, that's kind of you.

Mike

Offline John Candy

Re: Linisher - any suggestions?
« Reply #10 on: October 07, 2016, 09:25:58 AM »
Mike,

If you are wondering about the "brand" P Pro it was sold by B&Q for many, many years until quite recently.

I bought a compound mitre saw which has seen very heavy service over the past 4 years and is still as good as new; I have a 14.4V cordless drill which has outlasted several others bought more recently (including a Bosch) and is far more powerful than other 18V types and the battery lasts longer (including the 18V Bosch) and a I have a reciprocating saw which I have only needed to use a few times to cut recycled plastic board (20mm thick) and it has performed very well.

Unfortunately, they appear to have stopped selling P Pro and now sell  "McAllister" branded items....I think both P Pro and Mcallister are probably exclusive B&Q brands.

I wouldn't hesitate to buy a P Pro product if still available.

Regards,
John.
My fellow Members, ask not what your Society can do for you, ask what you can do for your Society.

Offline IanT

Re: Linisher - any suggestions?
« Reply #11 on: October 07, 2016, 02:21:58 PM »
Maybe not a wonderful bargain Mike but possibly worth a small extra bid - and no postage if local!

Regards,

IanT
Nothing's ever Easy - At least the first time around.