Author Topic: LMS Lego  (Read 4492 times)

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Offline cabbage

LMS Lego
« on: December 02, 2017, 05:55:07 PM »
I have bought a RepRap and been busy printing....



regards

ralph

Offline cabbage

Re: LMS Lego
« Reply #1 on: December 09, 2017, 01:24:27 PM »



Offline cabbage

Re: LMS Lego
« Reply #2 on: December 11, 2017, 09:35:56 AM »
The exterior wall is now complete and I have started printing the footbridge. This will be made from 150mm long modules and be 80mm wide. The first island piers have been printed and are a scale 7'6" high making the deck of the bridge 15' above platform level. I will probably design and print a set of smoke deflectors for each of the three tracks it has to span.

Progress is typically 15mins for a bracket and 75mins for a support border lattice. Printing it may not be fast but it is better than I could do!!!

Regards

Ralph

Offline Peaky 556

Re: LMS Lego
« Reply #3 on: December 11, 2017, 10:22:32 AM »
Does anyone have experience of using printed buildings etc in the garden, and how well they cope without getting brittle in cold weather for instance?  Another matter is how to get paint to stick and stay stuck.
Regards, Tim

Offline cabbage

Re: LMS Lego
« Reply #4 on: December 11, 2017, 05:56:38 PM »
Tim,

I have a feeling that I am the only person here -so the answer will have to be "I will let you now in a few years time". I have a sheet printed PLA that you can experiment on -but I plan to use standard grey car primer on the PLA and then use polyureathane varnish on the wood work before I spray it grey. I only worry about wind damage and (now) the amount of snow the bridge will take...

regards

ralph

Offline Peaky 556

Re: LMS Lego
« Reply #5 on: December 11, 2017, 06:45:01 PM »
Ralph,
Think about using Halfords car bumper primer which is quite popular I understand for plastic items outdoors. I assume it must have an etch role.  Good luck in this trail-blazing approach!
Tim

Offline John Candy

Re: LMS Lego
« Reply #6 on: December 11, 2017, 09:44:31 PM »
I have used "Plastikote" grey super primer on polyurethane resin castings, overpainted with Humbrol and Tamiya acrylics.
They have been outside for three Summers and Winters and are showing no sign of flaking. Biggest problem with plastics outdoors is expansion and contraction if exposed to extremes of temperature....joints tend to open up or compress and that can cause problems if fixed to a base board.
Long runs of platform are particularly susceptible and the high coefficient of expansion means it is almost impossible to prevent unless the cast objects are left free to move.

Regards,
John.
My fellow Members, ask not what your Society can do for you, ask what you can do for your Society.

Offline Gavin_B

Re: LMS Lego
« Reply #7 on: December 12, 2017, 11:30:43 AM »
Like every material PLA is bio degradable but in what timescales is the question.  People have left PLA 3d printed parts out for a year in the californion sun with no bad effects other than some colour bleaching. Others have buried parts in a compost bin for a year again with no side affects.

So well painted outside should not be a problem.

ASA (UV resistant ABS) would be better but gives of toxic fumes when printing.  PETG is even better but hard to print with.

G

Offline cabbage

Re: LMS Lego
« Reply #8 on: December 12, 2017, 12:32:14 PM »
As this is my first time with a RepRap I took the advice of an American friend and used PLA. It is supposed to be easy to print and I have to admit that it is!!! I am not overly concerned about detail , I am just printing bricks and steel girderwork. The second stage pier to the bridge should be complete by this evening and the other second stage pier by the weekend.

The bridge is a generic MR design and is a standard Warren Truss configuration. This means it would have taken the span of 45' and foottraffic with ease. There are the usual braces and cross beams. This is a functional piece not stylised as some of them that I have seen!!!

Regards

Ralph

Offline cabbage

Re: LMS Lego
« Reply #9 on: December 17, 2017, 03:37:45 PM »
According to the smart meter The electricity consumed over the 44hr 56mins to print all this was 3.16kWh...

Tim gave me a dead line to make it all look like a station. I think I will make it!

regards

ralph






Offline cabbage

Re: LMS Lego
« Reply #10 on: December 22, 2017, 02:16:51 PM »
well after 3 rolls (or 3kg) of PLA filament later we have this! The bridge spans three tracks and is 15 feet (scale) above the platform. The frontage is complete bar final assembly. The final part is primer and paint.

regards

ralph

PS sorry about the mess -but this is what we call the family room. Here you may play music and strum to your hearts content!!!




Offline cabbage

Re: LMS Lego
« Reply #11 on: January 07, 2018, 01:37:39 PM »

Offline cabbage

Re: LMS Lego
« Reply #12 on: February 07, 2018, 08:41:30 AM »
The station is finished, so before I plonk on the roof, here is what it looks like. I would suggest that before anyone else travels this route that they sit down and work out how many and types of module they are going to need. In the end I needed more bracket types than girder types. PLA has proved to be very easy to print with (thank you Thomas!) and eBay has provided cheap filament. Since I was going to prime and paint it I could buy the "unfashionable" and simply vile colours that no one else wanted to buy.






I was going to bring it to the AGM -but the table space precludes that. So, I am going to see if I can squeeze the bridge in the space allotted to the East Midlands Group. I have given it a "once over" with a can of red oxide -but the original PLA colours still show through(!)

regards

ralph

Offline blagdon

Re: LMS Lego
« Reply #13 on: February 07, 2018, 10:42:20 PM »
Looks very good Ralph!,  I do like the station name.

Ian the Gauge '3' Pirate

Offline Traininvain

Re: LMS Lego
« Reply #14 on: February 08, 2018, 05:31:45 PM »
Brilliant Ralph! Can you please do an article for the G3 Newsletter?

tx

Ian