Author Topic: 3D Scanning and Printing.  (Read 2419 times)

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Offline MikeWilliams

Re: 3D Scanning and Printing.
« Reply #15 on: February 23, 2018, 08:36:42 AM »
Could somebody post a picture showing the surface detail from one of these affordable machines please? I know expensive machines can be reasonable but pi tures and samples I have seen from home printers are mainly dreadful except for flat pieces like Ralph's building where they can be good. A closeup of a curved surface maybe?

Mike

Offline wolfstone

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Re: 3D Scanning and Printing.
« Reply #16 on: February 23, 2018, 10:39:12 AM »
I have had a tail lamp printed from an actual lamp that I measured and drew in AutoCAD Fusion 360. In the first print the handle was too delicate. Following a re-draw I hope to have some at the AGM if anyone is interested.

Tim

Offline wolfstone

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Re: 3D Scanning and Printing.
« Reply #17 on: February 23, 2018, 10:46:57 AM »
Further to post here is a

photo

Offline Doddy

Re: 3D Scanning and Printing.
« Reply #18 on: February 23, 2018, 11:50:25 AM »
Could somebody post a picture showing the surface detail from one of these affordable machines please? I know expensive machines can be reasonable but pictures and samples I have seen from home printers are mainly dreadful except for flat pieces like Ralph's building where they can be good. A close-up of a curved surface maybe?

Mike

It is a case of the relationship between the models scale and the dynamics (size) of the nozzle used, the print layers and a whole host of other factors.

As can be seen from this Aston Martin DB4, curves are not a problem on cheap 3D home printers . . .




This webpage shows the difference between 50micron and 16micron printing for an N gauge model locomotive.... https://www.shapeways.com/forum/t/black-high-definition-acrylate.39425/

And again for N gauge Networker EMUs http://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/index.php?/topic/99539-networker-emus-in-n-gauge/page-2

This is a 20micron prop spinner.




This G3 Scale Peak cab is printed on a commercial Polyjet system at 16microns and still requires a good cleanup, and whilst paint can be used to fill the lines and layers, rubbing the detail off grills and louvres and such, has put me off damaging the cab so far.



This G scale Hungarian V42 took 60 hours of printing and 70 hours rubbing down with sandpaper to get a smooth surface... http://www.instructables.com/id/V42-Electric-Locomotive-in-G-Scale-for-Garden-Rail/

This 'Big Boy' was printed over 1000 hours http://3dinsider.com/print-your-own-scale-model-4-8-8-4-big-boy-locomotive/

One of the keys to a good surface finish is the size of the filament used....




And the post processing of the printed items, be it with the use of generous amounts of sandpaper or as can be seen below - by the use of Acetone vapour baths.

"You don't know what you don't know"

Offline MikeWilliams

Re: 3D Scanning and Printing.
« Reply #19 on: February 23, 2018, 12:07:34 PM »
Thanks Doddy,

"16microns and still requires a good cleanup, and whilst paint can be used to fill the lines and layers, rubbing the detail off grills and louvres and such, has put me off damaging the cab so far." just about sums up my experience too, so printing direct to wax leaves no opportunity to clean up except on the final cast brass part.  I think the process is great for some things but is not yet the utopia that some firms are claiming for their cheap machines.  And, to put into perspective, what would that Peak cab (which is just fabulous!) cost to print commercially?

The Aston Martin is no real help with models because even 0.5mm layers wouldn't show on that and the originals were filled and rubbed down many times anyway.

Give it a few years and I suspect it will be the only way to make small components.

Mike

Offline Doddy

Re: 3D Scanning and Printing.
« Reply #20 on: February 23, 2018, 12:29:38 PM »
I was being flippant about the Aston Martin for precisely the reasons you point out.  ;D

The single (not pair) printed Peak Cab would be equal to three of your wagons at list price.

On all the variety test printing I had done in 2017 on Rep-Rap and PolyJet style machines to make an evaluation on print quality, there was an enormous amount of finishing to do.

As can be seen from my previous post Re: the V42, the builder printed that on a home printer but still spent 70 hours sanding it down. So your observations on post finishing are correct.
"You don't know what you don't know"

Offline cabbage

Re: 3D Scanning and Printing.
« Reply #21 on: February 23, 2018, 08:08:51 PM »
Here is a milk churn. This is printed at 0.2mm layer height, 0.4mm nozzle, PLA, 10% infil, and 200% frame rate.I took about 20mins.






Regards

Ralph

Offline Doddy

Re: 3D Scanning and Printing.
« Reply #22 on: February 24, 2018, 03:10:29 AM »
This is printed at 0.2mm layer height.

200Microns no less! This kind of supports the discussion on clean-up issues.
"You don't know what you don't know"

Offline Andy Mould

Re: 3D Scanning and Printing.
« Reply #23 on: February 24, 2018, 08:48:45 AM »
My wife is a Jeweller and when she designed her engagement ring it was printed straight to “wax” and I was most impressed by the quality of finish that was almost polished.

One thing that is clear is that 3D printing is moving forwards almost by the day for quality and cost.

Offline cabbage

Re: 3D Scanning and Printing.
« Reply #24 on: February 24, 2018, 10:07:08 AM »
Well.... This is also printed at 0.2mm layer. I could go to a higher resolution but since I am going to prime and paint it I really don't see any reason to.





Regards

Ralph