Author Topic: Coach/van roofs  (Read 483 times)

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Offline Jon Nazareth

Coach/van roofs
« on: January 19, 2018, 06:06:41 PM »
In the absence of a set of rollers, how do scratchbuilders make the roofs for their carriages/vans and out of what materials?

Jon

Offline John Candy

Re: Coach/van roofs
« Reply #1 on: January 19, 2018, 06:22:52 PM »
Jon,
I do have a slip roll machine and make my roofs of aluminium sheet.
Previously, I had made them from plastic card glued to roof hoops (also made from plastic card).
The plastic card or aluminium sheet can be shaped with a rolling pin, the sheeting being laid over a firm but compressible backing and the pin rolled back and forth until the required radius achieved.
Regards,
John.

P.S. Have since seen your photos of brake van which looks impressive.
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Offline Peaky 556

Re: Coach/van roofs
« Reply #2 on: January 19, 2018, 10:23:58 PM »
Jon, don’t discard the simple “model aircraft” approach of using very thin ply pulled down over formers, glued with PVA and held with many rubber bands until set.  I have used this so far with success.  I can measure the ply thickness if required, but note that this is normally 3-ply and so rolls much better in one direction than the other.
Regards, Tim

Offline 492

Re: Coach/van roofs
« Reply #3 on: January 20, 2018, 09:34:27 AM »
I like to produce "planking" using single ply and a small Proxxon type saw or a sharp knife and glue them with PVC wood glue to plywood formers matching the roof profile. the plywood formers should be made to fit within the ends of the wagon body and/or next to compartment divisions if a carriage. This has the advantage that the roof is removable. if a fixed roof is required the "planks can be joined to the ends and compartment dividers as in a full sized vehicle. The last "plank" on each side should be a little wider to allow for overhang.
Finally, the roof can be covered with close weave thin material, (pillow case, shirt etc) glued to it to represent the canvas.

I have found this method easier and more effective than trying to bend ply sheets. Also the suggestion of planking showing through the material is more authentic.

Robert. 492.


Offline Jon Nazareth

Re: Coach/van roofs
« Reply #4 on: January 21, 2018, 09:36:33 AM »
John Tim and Robert
Thank you for your ideas on how to build a roof, they are very much appreciated.  I presume that if I was to use ribs, some sort of jig would be required for them all to stand up while the planks or single roof covering was applied.  Any comments?

Jon

Offline 492

Re: Coach/van roofs
« Reply #5 on: January 21, 2018, 09:53:40 AM »
I usually just fix the ribs in place with masking tape etc. (so that they are exactly where they should be), then protect the top edges of the vehicle from glue, then glue on the "planking". When set the roof can be removed for covering, fixing vents etc. and painting.
The roof will be rigid and will sit in the vehicle firmly, whilst allowing easy removal.

Robert. 492.