Author Topic: GWR City class loco  (Read 1274 times)

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Offline John Candy

Re: GWR City class loco
« Reply #15 on: Jun 16 2019 19:31 »
Mike,

A very nice model ... I can forgive it for being G1!

A Saint (probably a "Lady" series with the original right-angled front drop end and level running plate) is in about eleventh place, behind LNWR, GCR and GNR locos to which I am already committed (as joint projects).
Taking into account my additional commitment to producing LNER/GNR/GCR coaching stock (as well as completing my garden line and sorting out Monkton Priors) I may well expire before I get to starting it!

While on the subject of coaches, what are you planning as a train for "Truro"?
My only GWR coaches are six E147 brake compos (the type sold by GRS as a 2-car "B set ).
I would like GWR "Toplight" gangwayed stock and a Dean clerestory or two and have looked at several options, both home produced and by commissioning laser cut or etched brass sides/ends.
As with everything, time is in short supply!

Regards,
John.
My fellow Members, ask not what your Society can do for you, ask what you can do for your Society.

Offline John Candy

Re: GWR City class loco
« Reply #16 on: Jun 17 2019 08:27 »
Mike,
Have you yet built the tender for "Truro" and , if not, is it your intention to build a Dean 3000 gallon as it appears in the photo in your earlier post?
The reason I ask is that I need a similar tender for a Collett Goods 2251 class and I am going to be cheeky and ask whether (as a commission at an agreed price) you would be willing to make a second?
After recent bad experiences with a "professional" model-maker, I am hesitant to outsource work but your work is clearly to a very high standard.
Won't be offended if you say "no" (time is precious) but thought it would be worth asking.
Regards,
John.

Footnote: This matter now subject of personal messages.
« Last Edit: Jun 19 2019 07:04 by John Candy »
My fellow Members, ask not what your Society can do for you, ask what you can do for your Society.

Offline 753

Re: GWR City class loco
« Reply #17 on: Jul 23 2019 17:13 »
Inside chassis of City tender, all wheels have side play and centre wheels are sprung, the brake gear is suspended from 1/16in rods which are removable to release the gear for painting and also allow play
The brake shoes are machined on a disc of ali as both sides need to be cut to form the tongue the centre being the reference point.

Mike




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Offline 753

Re: GWR City class loco
« Reply #18 on: Aug 02 2019 14:40 »
The tender for the City is complete, there are some detail jobs on the loco to do before a coat of primer is applied, then the final paint job on both.


Mike





Offline John Candy

Re: GWR City class loco
« Reply #19 on: Aug 02 2019 16:11 »
Very nice job, Mike.

What Mike hasn't mentioned is that this is just one of a pair of Dean 3000 gallon tenders he has just built.

The other is slightly different in detailing, being in 1930's condition, to accompany a 2251 class 0-6-0 which will shortly be added to my GWR collection.

John.
My fellow Members, ask not what your Society can do for you, ask what you can do for your Society.

Offline Peaky 556

Re: GWR City class loco
« Reply #20 on: Aug 02 2019 17:55 »
That’s lovely Mike. 

Changing to a more design-related subject, I was interested to see that the brakes on this loco are not the more normal ‘clench from both sides’ variety, as with a bicycle calliper brake clenching the rim, but instead just being pressed onto the trailing edge of the wheel.  I can see that this arrangement is better for the wheel bearings than if it were the leading edges of the wheel.  Reason?  As engineered, the reaction between brake block and tyre (in particular the moment), tends to unload the wheel bearing from its more normal thrust onto the top of the axle.  If it ran fast in reverse of course then it would accentuate wear of the wheel bushes, but that was deemed unlikely and probably undesirable by the CME.  Just musing!

Cheers, Tim

Offline 753

Re: GWR City class loco
« Reply #21 on: Aug 03 2019 09:40 »
Tim

I am no expert in running GWR engines, I would have thought the tender brakes were used just as a parking brake as there is no real pressure applied by the hand screw. The engine brakes were activated via a vacuum cylinder and thus more pressure applied.

Mike

Offline Doddy

Re: GWR City class loco
« Reply #22 on: Aug 03 2019 10:23 »
GWR Tender Brakes

Early tenders were steam-braked. It is thought that no 2000g or 2500g were ever fitted with vacuum brakes. Dean-era 3000g tenders were not fitted with vacuum brakes until the last few of 1904, which were designed to work with the first 28xx and 29xx locos. It is possible and even probable that more Dean-era 3000g underframes were altered to vacuum-fitting in their later years, and some Dean tops running with later Collett underframes did have vacuum tanks.

In 1906, commencing with the first 3500g tenders, vacuum brakes were fitted as standard.

 Vacuum tanks were initially fitted longitudinally, but a transverse orientation became the later standard. On Collett designs (3000g, 3500g and 4000g), the vacuum tanks were longitudinally mounted, but set up within the frames, and not generally visible in a side view. On the later Hawksworths, the vacuum tank was transverse mounted across the frames.

 Vacuum brake cylinders were under the shoveling plate, in front of the front axle, but also not visible in general view.

Brake hangars were of the 'twin-strip' form on early tenders, but were changed to the later Collett cast style, probably post-1930. Brake hangars on older tenders were often replaced with the cast ones when repairs and upgrades were made.

Ref: http://www.gwr.org.uk/no-tenders.html
"You don't know what you don't know"

Offline 753

Re: GWR City class loco
« Reply #23 on: Aug 03 2019 15:46 »
Bob

Thanks for the info, we learn a little every day.


Mike

Offline Doddy

Re: GWR City class loco
« Reply #24 on: Aug 03 2019 17:50 »
We do Mike, I did not know either until I read the post. Steam powered brakes? Wow glad they got rid of that idea.
"You don't know what you don't know"

Offline John Candy

Re: GWR City class loco
« Reply #25 on: Aug 04 2019 02:57 »
Many (relatively) modern steam locomotives were built with steam brakes .... including the Collett Goods 2251 class. Steam-braked locos were fitted with vacuum equipment (either crosshead-driven pumps or ejectors) to work the train brakes on passenger and fast freight workings. Crosshead driven pumps were a prominent feature on the RHS of many outside cylinder GWR locos.

Away from home and having a hot\ humid and sleepless night, hence typing this at 3am!

John.
My fellow Members, ask not what your Society can do for you, ask what you can do for your Society.

Offline 753

Re: GWR City class loco
« Reply #26 on: Aug 21 2019 11:50 »
City of Truro is complete, my interest lies in the pre grouping era of the GWR and I have built several examples in G1 over the years, but a City has been on the to do list for a long while, finally I have a G3 example.
Batteries are in the boiler splace and accessed through opening smokebox door, the electrics are in the tender also the sound card with the speaker under the coal
It has been a great pleasure to build in this scale, the engines seem almost real.

Mike













Offline John Branch

Re: GWR City class loco
« Reply #27 on: Aug 21 2019 12:01 »
It is also a great pleasure to witness the result 

Lovely job!
John

Offline John Candy

Re: GWR City class loco
« Reply #28 on: Aug 21 2019 23:27 »
Looks very nice in the Edwardian livery with polished brass trimmings and the Indian red frames.

Makes "Calcutta" look decidedly drab in its 1930's green and black!
What Mike hasn't mentioned is that he has built, not one but two, 3000 gallon Dean gallon tenders
at the same time as completing Truro ..... amazing how quickly the model has been completed!

The other tender is destined for my 2251 (Collett Goods) class and is in the later (1930's) condition.
Without Mike's help the 2251 may never have been built.

Regards,
John.




My fellow Members, ask not what your Society can do for you, ask what you can do for your Society.

Offline 753

Re: GWR City class loco
« Reply #29 on: Aug 22 2019 17:28 »
Johns x2

Thanks for your kind comments, I dont know about Calcuta being drab! one part of modeling railway engines and stock is I wish I could do is convinceing weathering, I have tried several times but all I create is a mess

Whilst it is pleasant to see engines fresh out of the shop in reality they did not stay that way for long even with the keenest cleaners efferts, I think engines look better with a layer well aplied dirt!!

Mike