Author Topic: Building an LNWR Picnic Saloon  (Read 403 times)

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Offline Nick

Building an LNWR Picnic Saloon
« on: Nov 21 2021 17:06 »
Mike Williams has a thread on this forum about the background to the Picnic Saloon kit. This one is complementary to it and is about the construction. I collected the kit from Mike at the G3 meeting in September. First impressions: detailed and comprehensive. It comes in a nice strong box plenty big enough for the finished model, and comprises laser cut steel sections for the underframe, etched brass body sides and ends and various bits and pieces, resin cast roof and internals, brass castings, whitemetal castings, Slaters wheels ... Mike says there are over 400 components and I'll take his word, I'm not about the count them. Not a quick kit, then, and probably not one for the beginner.







There are also 20 pages of instruction. Not exactly step by step instructions, more a description of the prototype, kit and building of the kit. I found that reading a page or two ahead was definitely a good idea because it helped me to understand what I was about to do, and often influenced the choices I was making. A few more drawings and photos would be helpful, but so far nothing has brought me to a complete stop.

First I assembled the underframe using soft solder. On Mike's advice, the parts were placed on, but not soldered to, the floor, to hold them in place. The plastic tape was to prevent flux getting on the floor. Rust is always a problem when soldering steel and I have no good solution to that one either.





Next step was to attach the hornguides. Rivet holes exist in the components, but Mike recommends using rivets only for locating purposes and soldering. I found that the rivets are a pretty good fit and decided to rely on them.








This is a good time to introduce my rivet squeezer which made it easy. It's not my idea, I got it from Roger who posts on the ProBoards forum.





The springs and hanger components are all cast in brass and required little cleaning up. The kit contains rivets for securing the various parts together, but I used brass wire of the same diameter that I had in stock because, leaving it long it provides something to hold on to while soldering everything together. The assembly was rather flexible and floppy until I could get it soldered to the frame. Forceps proved useful for holding everything in place but I did find that the frame cross-members made it difficult to get the soldering iron in everywhere. In retrospect, it would have been easier to complete each frame with the hornblocks, springs, and steps before soldering them to the headstocks and stretchers.





So far so good. Next up will be the headstock overlays and the brake gear.





Nick

Offline 753

Re: Building an LNWR Picnic Saloon
« Reply #1 on: Nov 22 2021 09:56 »
Nick

Mike W makes excellent kits should be an enjoyable build. When soldering steel I clean up the join with pumice powder and a toothbrush, it gets rid of the flux and cleans the steel, you can get a bag of pumice on e-bay the source of all things useful.

Mike

Offline Nick

Re: Building an LNWR Picnic Saloon
« Reply #2 on: Nov 22 2021 13:04 »
Hi Mike,

Thanks for the tip. Over many years I have tried just about everything except that, so my order for pumice powder is imminent.

Nick

Offline 753

Re: Building an LNWR Picnic Saloon
« Reply #3 on: Nov 22 2021 16:13 »
Nick

Once I have soldered up a structure I give it a good scrub with pumice and water, it cleans the joins and as it is a light abrasive it’s a good key for primer.
I used to use Vim but no one stocks it anymore!

Mike

Offline MikeWilliams

Re: Building an LNWR Picnic Saloon
« Reply #4 on: Nov 23 2021 07:43 »
That's interesting Mike.  I assume you use a fairly course grade.  I see it comes in 36 or 60 mesh - would you recommend 36?

Like the progress Nick.  Unfortunately Windows7 users don't appear to be able to see photographs on the forum anymore, so I've not seen them.   A Windows10 upgrade will, alas, be costly.

Mike

Offline John Candy

Re: Building an LNWR Picnic Saloon
« Reply #5 on: Nov 23 2021 08:29 »
Mike,
I was not aware of there being a problem.
Is it the "attachments", the "added" images or both?

Below are, firstly, an "added" photo (a Coal Tank), followed by an "attachment" (GWR 2251 class under construction).
Can you see either image?

John.


My fellow Members, ask not what your Society can do for you, ask what you can do for your Society.

Offline MikeWilliams

Re: Building an LNWR Picnic Saloon
« Reply #6 on: Nov 23 2021 12:43 »
Thank you John.  I can see the brass engine 2257a!

Mike

Offline John Candy

Re: Building an LNWR Picnic Saloon
« Reply #7 on: Nov 23 2021 13:28 »
Mike,
You are able to see the "attachment", so the problem is not with the forum but with the ibb.co website, which is being used to host the larger images.

Can you see the Coal Tank when you click on this http://ibb.co/wC6jhXF ?
John.
My fellow Members, ask not what your Society can do for you, ask what you can do for your Society.

Offline MikeWilliams

Re: Building an LNWR Picnic Saloon
« Reply #8 on: Nov 23 2021 14:05 »
No John.  If its a Windows & problem I may be the only one, so don't go to a lot of trouble just for me.

Mike

Offline Nick

Re: Building an LNWR Picnic Saloon
« Reply #9 on: Nov 23 2021 17:55 »
For those with computers that don't run pre-Cambrian operating systems, here are some more photos.

The headstocks are a steel underlay and etched brass overlays. Everything went together, except that there were no lamp brackets, just lugs where they should go. I made them up out of scrap etch material. Not a biggie.





The buffer bodies are whitemetal castings so I am leaving them until I'm totally sure that the soldering iron won't have to go anywhere near them. The photo also shows the steps in place on the frames. My logbook has nothing to say about them so I suppose they went in place just as they should.

Here's an interesting feature. There is a little resin cast block on each end of the headstock. The instructions say that they represent cast iron blocks added to make the steel channel headstocks look like planks of wood. I'm not doubting Mike who is an LNWR coach expert and has had plenty of opportunity to inspect the restored coach at Quainton, but why? Who would notice and be concerned about it? Is it the completely pointless feature it appears to be?





And, yes, there is plenty of surface rust to deal with.

Nick

Offline John Candy

Re: Building an LNWR Picnic Saloon
« Reply #10 on: Nov 23 2021 18:27 »
Mike,

It seems it is possible to upgrade from Win7 to Win10 for free ...... and it is legal.
https://www.howtogeek.com/509087/how-to-upgrade-from-windows-7-to-windows-10-for-free/
You will need to check your PC's spec (RAM size and HDD space) to ensure it meets the Microsoft requirements for Win10.

Incidentally, which browser are you using and is it the latest release?

John.
My fellow Members, ask not what your Society can do for you, ask what you can do for your Society.

Offline MikeWilliams

Re: Building an LNWR Picnic Saloon
« Reply #11 on: Nov 23 2021 20:51 »
Thank you John.  Its the cost of upgrading AutoCAD that's putting me off!

Yes Nick, there seems to be no point at all in the cast iron blocks on the ends of the headstocks, purely cosmetic!  It was however only ten years earlier that underframes were painted claret to match the bodies and fully lined out, so I guess these things did matter in those days.

Mike

Offline Nick

Re: Building an LNWR Picnic Saloon
« Reply #12 on: Nov 29 2021 18:01 »
The brake gear is where it got a bit, how shall we say, interesting? Most of the parts are etched brass. First of all there is a mounting frame to be folded up and joined to the frames, one for each of the outer wheelsets.







There are four sets of brakes, two on each wheelset, thus four triangular brake bars, made up of eight etches to be joined in pairs. Maybe I was having a dim day, but I assumed that when the instructions said join them in pairs, that meant in identical pairs ...





Only it didn't. It meant in pairs to make two sets of non-identical bars, on for each wheelset. So I had to unsolder what I had done. I managed to separate three of the four pairs of bars. The one that defeated me was the most delicate one without the crossbeam. To make replacements, I soldered the partners to this one to a sheet of brass of similar thickness and cut them out.





In doing so, I lost the hole for attaching to the equalising bar. That didn't concern me because I was planning to replace the attachments anyway with proper forked connectors. The instructions are to twist the etch through 90° to get the hole vertical seemed a bit on the crude side. At the same time, I made connectors for the pull rods to the vacuum cylinder rather than simply bend the end of the rod.





Mike Williams pointed out that the connectors will be hidden behind the wheels, as indeed they will unless you really look for them. Is it worth the effort? Decide for yourself!

Nick


Offline Richard T

Re: Building an LNWR Picnic Saloon
« Reply #13 on: Nov 30 2021 13:23 »




Mine went together fine.
Richard

Offline Richard T

Re: Building an LNWR Picnic Saloon
« Reply #14 on: Nov 30 2021 13:26 »




Better picture